Indian Doctors Conduct Country's First-Ever Uterus Transplantation

The surgeons will retrieve the uterus using a laparoscopic technique which is expected to shorten the duration of the procedure

The surgeons will retrieve the uterus using a laparoscopic technique which is expected to shorten the duration of the procedure

The hospital made a decision to go ahead with the first transplant only after Maharashtra directorate of health services granted it a five-year license after inspecting its facilities in April. "Fortunately, her mother was found to be a medically suitable uterus donor for her".

In 2013, the world's first uterus transplant was done in Sweden - where 36-year-old mother, who was born without a uterus, received a donated womb from a friend in her 60s.

The recipient woman would be able to menstruate normally and be able to conceive.

The surgery was performed by a team of doctors at Pune's Galaxy Care Hospital in southwest India. For uterus transplantation, the uterus can be taken from a blood relative of the woman who is undergoing transplantation. The donor is conscious and sitting up and having her food. She was born without a uterus and was keen to bear her own child instead of opting for surrogacy or adoption, which women in her condition would generally do.

Dr Puntambekar said this was the first uterus or womb transplant in India. The surgery began at around 12.30 pm and ended at 9.30 pm on 18th May.

After the transplant, the recipient will be kept at hospital for three weeks under observation and after eight months further procedure will be initiated.

On legal issues involving motherhood, Puntambekar said, "The transplant offers the recipient legal and biological right as a mother, as the ovary being used in the treatment is of the recipient".

The first such procedure was performed in Sweden in 2012 and the patient gave birth to the world's first baby from a transplanted uterus in 2014, and was conducted by Dr Mats Brännström, who had reportedly criticised the Indian procedure for its lack of proper preparation and for the risk that it would put both donor and receiver at. Here are few interesting facts about the first uterine transplant in India.

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