Let's sheath our swords, South Korea to North Korea

Let's sheath our swords, South Korea to North Korea

Let's sheath our swords, South Korea to North Korea

President Donald Trump last week criticized China for its ties with North Korea's government following the launch of a test missile, saying that China's economic interests undermined its ability to challenge President Kim Jong-un's totalitarian regime.

Beijing agreed in March 2016 to enforce United Nations sanctions following North Korea's test of a missile possibly capable of carrying a nuclear warhead.

If held, it would be the first such meeting between military authorities of the two sides since a working-level meeting that failed to produce an agreement on October 15, 2014, at Panmunjom, according to Yonhap News Agency.

"Simple accumulated data can not be used as evidence to question China's severe attitude in carrying out UN Security Council resolutions", Huang told a press briefing. "Trade related to the people's livelihood in the North Korea, especially those that embody humanitarian principles, should not be affected by sanctions".

Huang said coal imports dropped by three-quarters in the first half, and all those shipments had been made before February 18.

"We request military talks with the North on July 21 at Tongilgak to stop all hostile activities that raise military tension at the military demarcation line", Vice Defence Minister Suh Choo-suk told a media briefing Monday. "So much for China working with us - but we had to give it a try!"

"Trade between China and North Korea grew nearly 40% in the first quarter". Trump tweeted on July 5.

Chinese purchases of North Korea iron ore rose 34 per cent from a year earlier in the first five months of the year, according to a South Korean industry group, the Korea International Trade Association.

The US ambassador to the UN, Nikki Haley, said on Sunday that Washington would crank up pressure on China to ensure it implements sanctions over the missile test.

According to Fox News, the Data Base Centre for North Korean Human Rights, which is based in Seoul, has reported that about 50,000 North Koreans have been sent to Russian Federation in order to make money for the regime in Pyongyang.

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