U.S. judge rules lottery victor of US$560m can remain undisclosed

A winning Powerball ticket was sold in New Orleans for Saturday's drawing lottery officials said. It's worth $150,000

A winning Powerball ticket was sold in New Orleans for Saturday's drawing lottery officials said. It's worth $150,000

The woman who bought the winning ticket in January had gone to court to keep her name from being made public.

The New Hampshire woman who recently won a $560 million Powerball jackpot on Monday prevailed in her legal fight to keep her name out of the press, but the Fourth Estate could soon be descending on her hometown.

Judge Charles Temple noted that the case's resolution rested the state's Right-to-Know law, which governs access to public records for the woman.

Billy Shaheen, a lawyer for the New Hampshire victor, who was described in court papers only as Jane Doe, said that his client was elated to hear the news.

Judge Charles Temple is presiding over the bid by New Hampshire lotto victor "Jane Doe" to preserve her anonymity in Hillsborough Superior Court.

She was upset after learning she was giving up her anonymity by signing the ticket - something the lottery commission acknowledged isn't spelled out on the ticket, but is detailed on its website. But lottery officials had argued that even if the cash goes into a trust, the ticket will have to be submitted in its original form - complete with the ticket buyer's name and hometown.

"Although the Commission seemingly contends that these are isolated examples, there is evidence suggesting that Ms. Doe would also be subject to similar unwanted communication", Temple wrote.

"She will be able to live her life normally", he added.

Once taxes were deducted last week, Doe's trust collected more than $264 million.

"With another major winter storm in the forecast, personal and public safety are top priorities", said Michael Sweeney, Executive Director of the Massachusetts State Lottery in a written statement. She has already donated a combined US$250,000 to Girls Inc of New Hampshire, an empowerment group for girls, and three chapters of End 68 Hours of Hunger, which provides meals for school children during the weekends.

Abraham Shakespeare, the victor of a $30 million lottery prize in 2006, was approached two years later by a woman who said she was writing a book about how people were taking advantage of him, became his financial adviser and slowly siphoned away his money. The state Attorney General's Office said the woman's name must be revealed because she signed the back of the ticket, USA Today reported.

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