FCC chairman celebrates the end of net neutrality with more lies

Latin woman looking disappointed at her laptopscreen sitting behind her desk at the office

Latin woman looking disappointed at her laptopscreen sitting behind her desk at the office

The Republican-led Federal Communications Commission voted along party lines in December to repeal the rules, which were meant to prevent internet providers from blocking, speeding up, or slowing down access to specific online services.

An edge provider, for those wondering, is an individual or entity that provides content, applications or services over the internet, or devices for accessing any of those things over the internet, available to end-users, i.e., the consumers. In 2015, the FCC stripped the FTC - the nation's premier consumer protection agency - of its authority over internet service providers.

Ajit Pai, whom President Trump named to be his new FCC chairman, and who spearheaded the repeal of the net-neutrality rules, killed that inquiry soon after assuming the chairmanship.

Content providers like Netflix are in direct competition with Comcast, which owns NBC Universal and controls access to the internet for over 20 million customers.

Big changes could be headed to the internet industry as net neutrality becomes a policy of the past. The longer-term ramifications of a world without net neutrality is what concerns proponents of a fair and open internet - issues like a threat to free flow of information and a hazard to speech rights. This rule also bans ISPs from prioritizing content and services of their affiliates.

Supporters of net neutrality are concerned that without it, we could lose access to a free and open internet.

As of today, the end of net neutrality is official.

A new state law requires Internet service providers (ISPs), like Comcast and CenturyLink, to treat the delivery of all data equally no matter which company originates it.

Washington's net neutrality rule casts enforcement as a provision of consumer protection in an attempt to avoid stepping into federal telecommunications statutes.

A collection of advocacy groups has called for "mass online actions" on June 11 to once again call attention to the issue and pressure Congress to act.

"No one other than the giant cable companies thinks it's a good idea to let the giant cable companies dictate the speed and price of the content you view on the internet", says Rep. They can also set up "fast lanes" for preferred services - in turn, relegating everyone else to "slow lanes".

The revised rules were a win for ISPs, whose practices faced government oversight and FCC investigations under the 2015 order. "Democrats are fighting in the courts and in the Congress to protect Americans' interests and restore these vital protections, and we will continue to demand a vote on Congressman Mike Doyle's resolution to force a vote to restore net neutrality".

However, according to the FCC, states don't have the power to make their own policies. Such a scenario could be particularly devastating for startups with ambitions of becoming the next Netflix or Hulu, as they will have a much harder time paying ISP fees to compete early on.

Yet, some fear it's also possible internet providers will one day effectively charge customers more to access services like Netflix that are now included as part of your monthly bill.

Net Neutrality, a term coined by Columbia University media law professor and former NY state lieutenant governor candidate Tim Wu, is a rule where all telecommunication companies must treat all data equality and may not discriminate or charge differently.

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