NCAA passes reform that allows athletes to transfer without permission

NCAA announces transfer redshirt rule changes

NCAA announces transfer redshirt rule changes

Previously a player would lose his redshirt status after taking the field for a single play.

To address one specific concern, the Council specified that midyear enrollees can not use the exception to play a bowl game before their first academic term.

The NCAA has made several attempts in recent years to change transfer rules, but this is the first to come up with something substantive - if not comprehensive. The rule change ends the controversial practice in which some coaches or administrators would prevent students from having contact with specific schools. Then, the school will have two days to put the student's name in a national transfer data base.

"Conferences, however, still can make rules that are more restrictive than the national rule".

"This creates a safe place for student-athletes to have a conversation with their coaches and makes the whole process more transparent", Clark said.

As of now, this rule does not apply to sports other than college football, but the Division I Student-Athlete Experience Committee is examining "how a similar concept could be applied to other sports, including what number of games would be appropriate", according to the NCAA's release.

Under previous NCAA rules, programs could deny student-athletes permission to seek transfers to schools for any reason, no matter how inconsequential.

"This change promotes not only fairness for college athletes, but also their health and well-being", NCAA Division I Council chair and Miami athletic director Blake James said in a statement.

Over the past few months, CBS reported multiple other transfer proposals, including one that would force all student-athletes to sit out a year after transferring, and another that would lessen the mandated time out for students who meet a certain GPA threshold. "Coaches will appreciate the additional flexibility and ability to give younger players an opportunity to participate in limited competition". The NCAA also adopted a new policy this week that prevents schools from telling student-athletes where they can and can't transfer to.

Additionally, the proposal adds tampering with a current student-athlete at another school to the list of potential Level 2 violations, considered a significant breach of conduct.

That's one way the model could work, but there is no limitation, meaning that a player could be used in game one, then game eight, and then the Big Ten title game, and then the College Football Playoff and still count the year as a redshirt.

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