Loesch Slams Dems for 'Shameless Fearmongering' About Trump SCOTUS Pick

GettyImages-985520024

GettyImages-985520024

Women who have served as law clerks for Judge Brett Kavanaugh have written a letter to the Senate Judiciary Committee encouraging the Supreme Court nominee's confirmation.

White House spokesman Raj Shah claimed Kavanaugh went into debt by buying Washingon Nationals season tickets and playoff tickets for himself and a "handful" of friends.

In 2016, Kavanaugh reported having between $60,000 and $200,000 in debt accrued over three credit cards and a loan.

According to this system, the only judge more conservative than Kavanaugh is Justice Clarence Thomas.

Kavanaugh's disclosure shows that in 2016, he reported $60,000 to $200,000 of debt from three credit cards and a U.S. government loan, some of which was spent for home improvements, according to Shah.

The White House did not say how much of the debt came from ticket purchases, or name the friends involved in the transactions.

In Wednesday's podcast, Fallon said he believes Kaine is "one of the most honorable men in politics" but disagrees with his approach to Kavanaugh's nomination.

A Republican strategist involved in Senate races said court appointments are hugely motivating factors for evangelical voters and some rank-and-file Republicans who weren't Trump supporters right away.

Gleaning financial information from public disclosure forms has limitations.

But for Kavanaugh, the differences are stark between his finances and those of his would-be peers on the Court. Kavanaugh has a habit of going into debt, presumably to watch baseball, and also reported $60,000 to $200,000 in 2006, the year he was confirmed as an appellate judge.

Justice Neil Gorsuch, the Supreme Court's latest addition to the bench, reported $3.6 million and $10.5 million in assets on his latest financial disclosure.

"Judge Kavanaugh has written some troubling things about environmental protections, consumer protections, commonsense gun safety laws - all of which should be carefully examined by this Senate and by the American people", Minority Leader Chuck Schumer said.

The majority of Americans support Roe V. Wade, the landmark Supreme Court case that established the legal right to an abortion, a new poll has found. "Whoever is appointed will be in the job for thirty or forty years".

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