Russian official says Soyuz rocket failure caused by an errant sensor

Russia suspended all launches after the accident on October 11 unprecedented for Russia's post Soviet manned launches that saw the rocket fail minutes after blast-off

Russia suspended all launches after the accident on October 11 unprecedented for Russia's post Soviet manned launches that saw the rocket fail minutes after blast-off

"In order to avoid shifting the ISS to an unmanned mode, the industry is exerting considerable efforts to make the launch possible on December 3", Sergei Krikalyov, the executive director of the manned spaceflight program at Russia's Roskosmos space agency, said on October 31.

The first manned mission to the International Space Station since a Russian rocket failed to launch successfully earlier this month may take off on December 3, space agency Roscosmos said on Wednesday.

It was that explosion that caused the briefly-terrifying moment in the live launch video when the crew were briefly shaken around, prior to the capsule returning to land in Kazakhstan.

It was the third launch of a Soyuz rocket from Russia's northern Plesetsk launch pad this year, the military said.

"This is the first launch of a rocket from the Soyuz family since the October 11 accident", Russia's space agency chief Dmitry Rogozin wrote on Twitter.

The crew is set to include Canadian astronaut David Saint-Jacques, who was originally scheduled to fly to the station December 20 on a six-month mission.

The malfunction led to one of the four boosters on the first stage failing to detach correctly and colliding with a fuel tank of the second stage, which exploded.

The two crew members were then recovered by emergency workers near the Kazakh city of Dzhezkazgan, 400km (250 miles) north-east of the rocket launch site.

Roscosmos immediately set about investigating the launch failure, under time pressure because the current ISS crew had a January deadline to return to Earth.

In the first official report on the cause of the October 11 accident, Roscosmos said a sensor that indicated the separation of the first two stages of the rocket malfunctioned.

According to the official, a rode of the side unit of the Soyuz-FG rocket was misshaped during the assembly at Baikonur Cosmodrome. They have been driven to do this because, at present, the Soyuz spacecraft is the only means by which NASA, Russia, and their worldwide partners have of getting people to and from the station.

Notícias recomendadas

We are pleased to provide this opportunity to share information, experiences and observations about what's in the news.
Some of the comments may be reprinted elsewhere in the site or in the newspaper.
Thank you for taking the time to offer your thoughts.