Michigan Voters Legalize Marijuana

Midterms and marijuana: These 4 states will vote on legal pot

Midterms and marijuana: These 4 states will vote on legal pot

MI just joined nine other states, the District of Columbia, and Canada in legalizing recreational marijuana.

Utah's medical marijuana legalization measure, which would allow privately owned dispensaries to sell cannabis, saw support drop in polls after state lawmakers said they had reached a compromise plan to instead allow patients to obtain cannabis from county health departments or a handful of state-approved pharmacies. It also became the first state in the midwest to legalize marijuana. California was the first, recognizing in 1996 the therapeutic uses of marijuana in easing the symptoms of serious illnesses like HIV, cancer, epilepsy, PTSD and glaucoma.

North Dakotans decisively rejected a proposal to make marijuana legal for recreational purposes.

Voters in four states are casting ballots on measures to legalize marijuana Tuesday, further testing the Trump administration's stance on the subject following the federal government's reversal of Obama-era law enforcement policies.

The measure passed by a 56-44 percent margin.

MI now joins nine other states that have legalized marijuana for all uses: Washington, Colorado, California, Oregon, Alaska, Massachusetts, Maine, Nevada and Vermont.

Proposal 1 allows adults aged 21 and older to possess up to 2.5 ounces of marijuana. Possession of marijuana by minors would be treated the same as possession of alcohol. Violations of the law would result in civil infractions or criminal charges, depending on the severity of the offense. The initiative requires all marijuana and marijuana products to be tested for safety and includes strict tracking requirements to ensure that marijuana is not diverted into the unregulated market.

Proposal 1 allows cities and towns to regulate, ban, or limit the number of marijuana businesses in the community. MI will also levy a tax on the sale of recreation cannabis. The latter is the only state that does not authorize marijuana stores.

Selling marijuana without a license, or selling marijuana to a minor, would still be criminal and would hold the same harsh penalties as today.

Supporters estimate proposition one will bring in roughly $130,000,000 in tax revenue each year.

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