Craters surrounding ‘Chang’e-4’ pose challenge to lunar rover

China's lunar rover Yutu-2 or Jade Rabbit 2 rolling onto the far side of the moon taken by the Chang'e-4 lunar probe is seen in this image provided by China National Space Administrati

China's lunar rover Yutu-2 or Jade Rabbit 2 rolling onto the far side of the moon taken by the Chang'e-4 lunar probe is seen in this image provided by China National Space Administrati

China on Friday broadcast pictures taken by its rover and lander on the far side of the moon, in what its space programme hailed as another triumph for the groundbreaking mission.

The lander, the rover and the relay satellite are in good condition.

"One of the craters close to the rover Yutu-2 has a diameter of about 20 meters and a depth of about 4 meters".

The probe, comprised of a lander and a rover, touched down at the preselected landing area at 177.6 degrees east longitude and 45.5 degrees south latitude in the Von Karman Crater in the South Pole-Aitken (SPA) Basin on the far side of the Moon on January 3. The rugged terrain will pose great challenges for planning the route of the rover. "For the first time in human history, the spacecraft made a soft landing and patrol survey on the back of the moon, and for the first time realized the relay communication with the Earth on the back of the moon, and with many countries".

"Researchers completed the preliminary analysis of the lunar surface topography around the landing site based on the image taken by the landing camera", CLEP said in a statement accompanying the release of the images.

The video, lasting about 12 minutes, shows the probe adjusted its altitude, hovered and avoided obstacles during the descent process. "We will conduct comparative research between the landing areas of Chang'e-3 and Chang'e-4", Li said.

Because the far side faces away from Earth, it is also shielded from radio transmissions - making it the ideal place from where to study the universe. The Chinese mission was to land on the side of the moon that is never seen from earth due to the moon rotation, a phenomenon called "tidal locking".

Chang'e-4 was launched from Xichang Satellite Launch Centre in China on 7 December.

To overcome the problem, the China National Space Administration launched the Queqiiao relay satellite, last May to assist with the relay exchange between Earth and the Chang'e-4 probe. A lunar radioisotope heater system contributed by Russian Federation now provides the vital power supply to the probe during the moon's long, frigid nights.

China's Jade Rabbit-2 rover awoke from its extended nap on the moon on Thursday, taking to social media to inform space enthusiasts that it's headed back to work after its five-day hibernation.

"International cooperation is the future of lunar exploration. We hope to have more global cooperation", said Wu Weiren.

Notícias recomendadas

We are pleased to provide this opportunity to share information, experiences and observations about what's in the news.
Some of the comments may be reprinted elsewhere in the site or in the newspaper.
Thank you for taking the time to offer your thoughts.