4th Hottest Year On Record, Arctic Warming Faster

Earth’s long-term warming trend can be seen in this visualization of NASA’s global temperature record which shows how the planet’s temperatures are changing over time compared to a baseline average from 1951 to 1980. The record is shown as a runni

Earth’s long-term warming trend can be seen in this visualization of NASA’s global temperature record which shows how the planet’s temperatures are changing over time compared to a baseline average from 1951 to 1980. The record is shown as a runni

A still image pauses the onslaught of warmer temperatures in NASA and NOAA data summarizing global climate changes.

Global temperatures in 2018 were the fourth warmest since records began in 1880, United States government scientists have confirmed.

New data confirms last year was one of the hottest ever recorded, and British meteorologists are predicting the next five years will be even hotter than 2018.

The past five years have been the hottest in human history.

"Across the globe, 2018 was extremely warm, with only a few places that were below our normal period [which runs from 1951 to 1980]", Gavin Schmidt, a climate scientist and director of NASA's Goddard Institute for Space Studies, said during a news conference held to announce the report.

NASA does point out that weather dynamics affect regional temperatures, so not every region on Earth saw similar amounts of warming.

A United Nations report past year said the world is likely to breach 1.5 degrees Celsius sometime between 2030 and 2052 on current trends, triggering ever more heat waves, powerful storms, droughts, mudslides, extinctions and rising sea levels.

All the results show the same "escalator-like" rise that scientists think is linked to the loss of sea ice, as well as an increase in extreme weather events around the world.

NASA says that since the 1880s, the average global surface temperature has risen about 2°F (1°C).

The impacts of long-term global warming are already being felt - in coastal flooding's, heat waves, intense precipitation and ecosystem changes.

According to NASA, its temperature analyses incorporates surface temperature measurements from 6,300 weather stations, ship- and buoy-based observations of sea surface temperatures, and temperature measurements from Antarctic research stations.

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