Self-harm clips hidden in kids' cartoons

Florida Mom Discovers Suicide Instructions in YouTube Videos For Children

Florida Mom Discovers Suicide Instructions in YouTube Videos For Children

But disturbing videos recently found by some moms show the social media site may not be safe for kids at all.

Hess, a pediatrician, put out a call to action to different groups to report the video to get it removed from the site.

"I was shocked", Dr Hess said, adding that the scene has been inserted into several more YouTube and YouTube Kids videos from the popular Nintendo game Splatoon.

YouTube boasts that YouTube Kids contains a number of safety-minded features, including the ability for parents to handpick which videos their children are able to watch, as well as human and automatic filters to keep out content deemed not to be family-friendly.

Earlier this month, she found a second one - this time on YouTube.com.

I don't doubt that social media and things such as this are contributing, "she later told CNN". "I'm a pediatrician, and I'm seeing more and more kids coming in with self harm and suicide attempts".

"But we have to start doing something NOW and we should start by educating ourselves, educating our children, and speaking up when we see something that is risky for our children", Hess added on her PediMom blog.

Dr. Free Hess of Gainesville posted the video on her PediMom Facebook page.

The mother also goes to compile videos of Minecraft videos with multiple shooting scenes including one within a school.

"So anything that's not curated by the parent, we can not just assume they are not going to be viewing things that are 100 percent safe", said Rogers-Wood.

Hess wants YouTube to do a better job of screening videos intended for YouTube Kids.

Andrea Faville, a spokeswoman for YouTube, said in a written statement that the company works to ensure that it is "not used to encourage risky behavior and we have strict policies that prohibit videos which promote self-harm".

According to the Washington Post, Andrea Faville, a spokesperson for YouTube, said that the company is working to make sure that its platform is "not used to encourage risky behavior and we have strict policies that prohibit videos which promote self-harm".

"We are always working to improve our systems and to remove violat [ing] content more quickly".

The videos follows mounting pressure for the world's largest video-sharing platform to monitor and remove problematic content. But she thinks by the time someone reports something, it could have already caused harm. Kids are young to understand the consequences and it would be too late before parents realise it.

"There is this disconnect between what kids know about technology and what their parents know because the parents didn't grow up with it", she said.

"It can sometimes be very challenging for parents to keep up with the fast moving digital age but communication still plays a vital role when it comes to teaching children about the real risks of the internet".

Most importantly, she says, parents need to team up with each other to combat this problem. "We also need to fight to have the developers of social media platforms held responsible when they do not assure that age restrictions are followed and when they do not remove inappropriate and/or risky material when reported".

For confidential support in Australia call the Lifeline 24-hour crisis support on 13 11 14.

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