OH passes twice-vetoed law to ban abortions after fetal heartbeat

Columbus Ohio. DeWine's signature makes Ohio the fifth state to ban abortions after the first detectable fetal heartbeat. That can come

Columbus Ohio. DeWine's signature makes Ohio the fifth state to ban abortions after the first detectable fetal heartbeat. That can come

Mike DeWine signed a bill that would make it illegal to carry out an abortion once a fetal heartbeat is detected.

OH became the sixth state in the nation on Thursday to outlaw abortion from the time when a fetal heartbeat can be detected.

Similar bills have been filed in at least seven other states with anti-abortion GOP majorities in their legislatures.

The law outlaws abortions after doctors are able to detect a fetal heartbeat, in effect banning the procedure after the sixth week of pregnancy.

This near-total abortion ban abandons the health of mothers and provides no exceptions for rape and incest, banning abortion after five to six weeks, before most women even know they're pregnant. Some would tighten restrictions on clinics; others seek to ban certain categories of abortions. "Government's role should be to protect life from the beginning to the end, to protect those who can not protect themselves, such as the elderly, the unborn, those who are sick, those who have mental illness or have an addiction", DeWine said at a mid-afternoon signing ceremony at the Ohio Statehouse April 11.

After Kentucky's governor signed the heartbeat bill, and before it was blocked, "we could feel the fear", said Marcie Crim of the Kentucky Health Justice Network, which runs a fund supporting Kentuckians who opt to get abortions.

In Georgia, where Kemp is expected to sign the heartbeat bill soon, more than 50 actors, including Alyssa Milano, Alec Baldwin and Amy Schumer, have threatened a campaign to pull Hollywood productions out of Georgia - a hub for TV and movie projects - if the ban is enacted.

DeWine says he knows this law, renamed the "Human Rights Protection Act", will likely face a court challenge.

"This legislation is blatantly unconstitutional and we will fight to the bitter end to ensure that this bill is permanently blocked", said Freda Levenson, the legal director of the ACLU of OH, in a statement.

This bill is a disgrace, and it will endanger women's lives in Ohio. "We will fight to the bitter end to ensure that this bill is permanently blocked".

'Taking this action really is a kind of a time-honored tradition, the constitutional tradition of making a good faith argument for modification or reversal of existing legal precedents, ' he said.

"Will there be a lawsuit?"

"We are going to try to legislate and create an atmosphere in which people can trust women, especially black women, to take care of their bodies because right now, women are not trusted", explains state Rep. Janine Boyd (D- Cleveland). "We're excited about it".

Anti-abortion groups such as Ohio Right To Life say they intend the heartbeat bill to trigger a U.S. Supreme Court case striking down the 1973 Roe v. Wade decision. That case legalized abortion up until viability, usually at 22-24 weeks.

"If this is what it takes, we will see you at the Supreme Court", said Planned Parenthood of Ohio President Iris Harvey at a rally Wednesday outside the Statehouse.

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