Australian PM admits gay people don't go to hell

Labor leader Bill Shorten debating with Prime Minister Scott Morrison the Liberal leader last Wednesday. Both sides are campaigning through Chinese-language channels to win votes in closely fought seats

Labor leader Bill Shorten debating with Prime Minister Scott Morrison the Liberal leader last Wednesday. Both sides are campaigning through Chinese-language channels to win votes in closely fought seats

Folau's recent Instagram post asserted that Hell awaits all homosexuals, so Prime Minister Scott Morrison was asked yesterday if he believes the same thing.

Of same-sex marriage, Morrison said: "It's law, and I'm glad that the change has now been made and people can get on with their lives, that's what I'm happy about".

Nine prominent Christian church leaders in the country wrote to both political candidates this week asking for protections for religious beliefs and freedom of speech as pressure to endorse homosexuality increases in Australian society. "It's always been something that's informed how I live my life and how I seek to care for and support others".

Leaders of Australia's major political parties announced today that gay people don't go to hell for their sexual orientation.

"I can not believe that the prime minister has not immediately said that gay people will not go to hell", he told reporters. I don't believe it.

Mr Morrison went on to say that "my faith is not about politics, it's about just who I am". The nation's got to stop eating itself in this sort of madness of division and toxicity.

The leaders of both of Australia's major political parties agreed on Tuesday that gays don't go to hell due to their sexual orientation, as Christian beliefs rose to extraordinary prominence in the final days of an election campaign.

Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison, a Pentecostal Christian, has now told media he does not believe gay people go to hell - despite yesterday dodging a question on the topic in the wake of the Israel Folau saga.

Opposition leader Bill Shorten this afternoon criticised Mr Morrison's answer, or lack thereof, telling media in Tasmania that "I can not believe that the Prime Minister has not immediately said that gay people will not go to hell".

He later added: "It is not my view that's the case". God's love is for everybody. That is what I always seek to do. I don't think that should have a place in this election campaign. People's faith are people's faith. And, you know, I'm not running for Pope.

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