Trump reportedly mulling order paving the way for Huawei ban

Open this

Open this

A Huawei logo is pictured during the media day for the Shanghai auto show in Shanghai, China April 16, 2019.

It will invoke the International Emergency Economic Powers Act, giving the president jurisdiction over interstate commerce in case of an "unusual and extraordinary threat" to the "national security, foreign policy, or economy of the United States" originating "in whole or substantial part outside the United States", according to the officials, who said the US Department of Commerce would be responsible for developing an enforcement framework. While the big four U.S. wireless carriers - Verizon, AT&T, T-Mobile, and Sprint - have agreed not to use Huawei in their 5G networks, smaller carriers have made no such agreements, and many use equipment from Huawei and ZTE for cost reasons.

Washington has told allies not to use Huawei's technology to build new 5G telecommunications networks because of worries it could be a vehicle for Chinese spying, an accusation the firm has denied. Huawei, which has repeatedly denied the allegations, did not immediately comment.

The White House and Commerce Department declined to comment.

President Donald Trump is poised to issue an executive order as early as Wednesday that would effectively prohibit U.S. companies from using any telecoms equipment manufactured by China's Huawei.

Canadian authorities last December arrested Huawei's Chief Financial Officer Meng Wanzhou at the request of the USA, which seeks her extradition over allegations of violating Iran sanctions.

The U.S. has been trying without success to persuade other governments to exclude to exclude equipment made by Huawei from super-fast 5G mobile networks that will connect billions of devices.

Last week, the U.S. Federal Communications Commission barred China Mobile Ltd. from the U.S. market over national security concerns and said it was opening a review of other Chinese companies.

The FCC voted unanimously to deny China Mobile Ltd's bid to provide USA telecommunications services last week and said it was reviewing similar prior approvals held by China Unicom and China Telecom Corp.

While the big wireless companies have already cut ties with Huawei, small rural carriers continue to rely on both Huawei and ZTE switches and other equipment because they tend to be cheaper.

Notícias recomendadas

We are pleased to provide this opportunity to share information, experiences and observations about what's in the news.
Some of the comments may be reprinted elsewhere in the site or in the newspaper.
Thank you for taking the time to offer your thoughts.