Steve Kroft to Retire From 60 Minutes

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It's the end of an era for 60 Minutes: When Steve Kroft wraps up his 30th season with the newsmagazine, he is retiring, CBS has revealed.

America's most-watched news program.

Kroft, the news magazine's longest-tenured reporter, will announce his plans Sunday at the end of the program's 51st season finale, CBS-TV said.

"From the moment Steve Kroft arrived at CBS News in 1980, he has been shot out of a cannon and wherever he landed his stories broke news, had depth, and a strong sense of humanity", said Susan Zirinsky, CBS News' president and senior executive producer, in a statement.

When Kroft came to 60 Minutes in 1989, he joined what CBS News is fond of calling its journalists' Murderers' Row - an all-male club that included Mike Wallace, Morley Safer, Harry Reasoner and Ed Bradley. A special looking back at his career will air in September.

Variety said Kroft's final investigative report examines bank fraud and a money laundering scheme. And his 1992 conversation with Bill and Hillary Clinton - which aired immediately after Super Bowl XXVI - arguably stands as one of his signature interviews. A story on insider trading in U.S. Congresss drove the passage of an act that barred such practices in 2012. Kroft interviewed Obama 11 times during his presidential term.

Kroft, 73, broke into news as a correspondent and photographer for the Pacific edition of Stars and Stripes, the US military newspaper, while serving in the Army in Vietnam.

At the network, he reported on the civil war in El Salvador and the invasion of Grenada before transferring to London where he covered European affairs and terrorism for "CBS Evening News". That led to his being named principal correspondent for CBS News' fledgling newmag West 57 Kroft's stepping-stone to 60 Minutes.

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